1. woodendreams:

(by Iggy63)
  2. ➞ Art Blog

    My very talented older brother put his artwork online (finally)! Please visit his page and reblog/like/follow! :) thanks guys!

  3. jiffyphoto:

Mojave Desert

    jiffyphoto:

    Mojave Desert

  4. This is an example of the limestone/dolomite bedrock found at Natural Bridge. Field notebook for scale.

    This is an example of the limestone/dolomite bedrock found at Natural Bridge. Field notebook for scale.

  5. spacettf:

Epsilon Eridani by digital_drew on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Epsilon Eridani is an orange dwarf located 10.5 light years away. The star is moderately young, at an estimated age of 500 million years. Its circumstellar environment may be reminiscent of conditions in our own solar system four billion years ago. The Epsilon Eridani system has at least two asteroid belts, thick zodiacal dust, as well as an outer disk of icy material. Evidence suggests it has at least two gas giant planets.

    spacettf:

    Epsilon Eridani by digital_drew on Flickr.

    Via Flickr:
    Epsilon Eridani is an orange dwarf located 10.5 light years away. The star is moderately young, at an estimated age of 500 million years. Its circumstellar environment may be reminiscent of conditions in our own solar system four billion years ago. The Epsilon Eridani system has at least two asteroid belts, thick zodiacal dust, as well as an outer disk of icy material. Evidence suggests it has at least two gas giant planets.

  6. cracks-of-reality:

Apophyllite with Stilbite from India

    cracks-of-reality:

    Apophyllite with Stilbite from India

  7. enchantedengland:

 An Oxbow, or Ox-bow, lake is a U-shaped body of water named for the distinctive curved shape resembling the yoke of an oxen. This is one of the many Oxbow lakes in the Cuckmere Valley in East Sussex, England. It’s a descriptive name, rather than a place name. (Post dedicated to last-nigh-on-earth, who brought up the topic)
by Egdoh on panoramio.com

    enchantedengland:

     An Oxbow, or Ox-bow, lake is a U-shaped body of water named for the distinctive curved shape resembling the yoke of an oxen. This is one of the many Oxbow lakes in the Cuckmere Valley in East Sussex, England. It’s a descriptive name, rather than a place name. (Post dedicated to last-nigh-on-earth, who brought up the topic)

    by Egdoh on panoramio.com

  8. thomaspowers:
  9. rockpile:

(via Dave’s Landslide Blog: The mechanism of the Highway 3 landslide in Taiwan)
  10. needsmoreoomph:

    Crappy cell phone pictures from a geology trip the other week. Might as well use the tumblr for all of the pointless stuff I feel like sharing. Wish I’d had a camera that could’ve done some of the things I saw justice.

    (Source: floofyduckbutt)

  11. ghendel:

At the end of the last ice age, around 11,500 years ago, our planet  entered the Holocene, an epoch of climatic stability and warmth. People  came out of their caves and took advantage of the new conditions; they  started farming and settling in villages and towns, which led to  development of cultures and the rise of entire civilizations.
However,  since the industrial revolution, human activity has accelerated and  become so profound and global that many scientists think we have pushed  the planet across a new geological boundary, into what some are calling  the Anthropocene (which literally means the “age of man”). Now  geologists are considering whether to formally define the new age,  recognizing it in the same way as the Jurassic, Cambrian, or Holocene.
The photo is of Bingham Mine, the world’s largest open pit mine (copper), located outside of Salt Lake City and clearly visible from the International Space Station. Is is still growing and in operation today.

    ghendel:

    At the end of the last ice age, around 11,500 years ago, our planet entered the Holocene, an epoch of climatic stability and warmth. People came out of their caves and took advantage of the new conditions; they started farming and settling in villages and towns, which led to development of cultures and the rise of entire civilizations.

    However, since the industrial revolution, human activity has accelerated and become so profound and global that many scientists think we have pushed the planet across a new geological boundary, into what some are calling the Anthropocene (which literally means the “age of man”). Now geologists are considering whether to formally define the new age, recognizing it in the same way as the Jurassic, Cambrian, or Holocene.

    The photo is of Bingham Mine, the world’s largest open pit mine (copper), located outside of Salt Lake City and clearly visible from the International Space Station. Is is still growing and in operation today.

  12. (Source: warsher, via elenaluciano)

  13. bofknowledge:

Most people consider Mt. Nyiragongo to be the world’s most violent volcano.Unlike eruptions in Hawaii which are relatively slow and could be outran, Mt. Nyiragongo’s steep slope causes lava to flow as fast as 60 mph!
Check out the full article here
http://bowlofknowledge.blogspot.com/2011/08/extremes-of-earth.html

    bofknowledge:

    Most people consider Mt. Nyiragongo to be the world’s most violent volcano.Unlike eruptions in Hawaii which are relatively slow and could be outran, Mt. Nyiragongo’s steep slope causes lava to flow as fast as 60 mph!

    Check out the full article here

    http://bowlofknowledge.blogspot.com/2011/08/extremes-of-earth.html

    (via k-tboundary-deactivated20130724)

  14. n-a-s-a:

Mount St. Helens Rebirth (by NASA Goddard Photo and Video)

    n-a-s-a:

    Mount St. Helens Rebirth (by NASA Goddard Photo and Video)

    (via life-is-go0d)

  15. ifsweetnesscanwin:

arenaceous shale.

    ifsweetnesscanwin:

    arenaceous shale.

    (via life-is-go0d)