1. thomaspowers:
  2. it-sfullofstars:

BIF
  3. migeo:

I love this stuff. I love a rock that is, basically, all shells and can make cannonballs bounce. So when I had a chance to get my hands on some coquina for the first time ever, you can bet I fondled it. It’s harder than you’d expect for something famously soft enough to absorb enormous balls of metal hurtling toward them at speeds meant to destroy. It feels quite solid. And very, very shelly. (via En Tequila Es Verdad)

    migeo:

    I love this stuff. I love a rock that is, basically, all shells and can make cannonballs bounce. So when I had a chance to get my hands on some coquina for the first time ever, you can bet I fondled it. It’s harder than you’d expect for something famously soft enough to absorb enormous balls of metal hurtling toward them at speeds meant to destroy. It feels quite solid. And very, very shelly. (via En Tequila Es Verdad)

  4. 
Just Being There - A Panorama of Yosemite National Park (by Darvin Atkeson)

    Just Being There - A Panorama of Yosemite National Park (by Darvin Atkeson)

    (Source: geologise, via kyaniteas)

  5. letslook4treasure:

Baleal - Portugal (by ©miguel valle de figueiredo)
  6. migeo:

The Glamorgan Heritage Coast of South Wales, U.K., formed millions of years ago when present day Wales was nearly completely submerged. These exposed, eroded early Lower Lias or early Jurassic rocks, primarily limestone and shale, are readily accessible to rock hounds and to people who simply enjoy strolling along the shore. The beach platforms, cliffs and sea caves (like this one) here are all quite spectacular both when viewed from the cliff-top paths and when exploring up close. Make sure to consult tidal charts before investigating the sea caves since this portion of the Welsh coast has a considerable tidal range - over 50 ft (16 m). Photo taken on July 20, 2011. Credit: Stephen Gledhill. (via EPOD)

    migeo:

    The Glamorgan Heritage Coast of South Wales, U.K., formed millions of years ago when present day Wales was nearly completely submerged. These exposed, eroded early Lower Lias or early Jurassic rocks, primarily limestone and shale, are readily accessible to rock hounds and to people who simply enjoy strolling along the shore. The beach platforms, cliffs and sea caves (like this one) here are all quite spectacular both when viewed from the cliff-top paths and when exploring up close. Make sure to consult tidal charts before investigating the sea caves since this portion of the Welsh coast has a considerable tidal range - over 50 ft (16 m). Photo taken on July 20, 2011. Credit: Stephen Gledhill(via EPOD)

    (via chondritic)

  7. migeo:

Ventifact ridge, Death Valley. (by Adam M. Forte)

    migeo:

    Ventifact ridge, Death Valley. (by Adam M. Forte)

  8. fmlcorvuscrow:

isotropic garnets in schist - taken using polarized microscope in my mineralogy class

    fmlcorvuscrow:

    isotropic garnets in schist - taken using polarized microscope in my mineralogy class

  9. migeo:

A boiling stream (by mgjefferies)
This stream runs into the Firehole River from the Excelsior Geyser crater and delivers some 15000 to 17000l of water a minute at 93C into the river. Must be a shock to the trout! The colours are due to the various minerals and micro-organisms that are found in this hot environment. The whole bank side is built up by deposits from the water over time.

    migeo:

    A boiling stream (by mgjefferies)

    This stream runs into the Firehole River from the Excelsior Geyser crater and delivers some 15000 to 17000l of water a minute at 93C into the river. Must be a shock to the trout! The colours are due to the various minerals and micro-organisms that are found in this hot environment. The whole bank side is built up by deposits from the water over time.

  10. thomaspowers:

A Fold

*drool*

    thomaspowers:

    A Fold

    *drool*

  11. dazzlingagony:

Jester photography by sassaputzin

    dazzlingagony:

    Jester photography by sassaputzin

    (via dazzlingagony-deactivated201111)