1. thomaspowers:
  2. ghendel:

At the end of the last ice age, around 11,500 years ago, our planet  entered the Holocene, an epoch of climatic stability and warmth. People  came out of their caves and took advantage of the new conditions; they  started farming and settling in villages and towns, which led to  development of cultures and the rise of entire civilizations.
However,  since the industrial revolution, human activity has accelerated and  become so profound and global that many scientists think we have pushed  the planet across a new geological boundary, into what some are calling  the Anthropocene (which literally means the “age of man”). Now  geologists are considering whether to formally define the new age,  recognizing it in the same way as the Jurassic, Cambrian, or Holocene.
The photo is of Bingham Mine, the world’s largest open pit mine (copper), located outside of Salt Lake City and clearly visible from the International Space Station. Is is still growing and in operation today.

    ghendel:

    At the end of the last ice age, around 11,500 years ago, our planet entered the Holocene, an epoch of climatic stability and warmth. People came out of their caves and took advantage of the new conditions; they started farming and settling in villages and towns, which led to development of cultures and the rise of entire civilizations.

    However, since the industrial revolution, human activity has accelerated and become so profound and global that many scientists think we have pushed the planet across a new geological boundary, into what some are calling the Anthropocene (which literally means the “age of man”). Now geologists are considering whether to formally define the new age, recognizing it in the same way as the Jurassic, Cambrian, or Holocene.

    The photo is of Bingham Mine, the world’s largest open pit mine (copper), located outside of Salt Lake City and clearly visible from the International Space Station. Is is still growing and in operation today.

  3. bofknowledge:

Most people consider Mt. Nyiragongo to be the world’s most violent volcano.Unlike eruptions in Hawaii which are relatively slow and could be outran, Mt. Nyiragongo’s steep slope causes lava to flow as fast as 60 mph!
Check out the full article here
http://bowlofknowledge.blogspot.com/2011/08/extremes-of-earth.html

    bofknowledge:

    Most people consider Mt. Nyiragongo to be the world’s most violent volcano.Unlike eruptions in Hawaii which are relatively slow and could be outran, Mt. Nyiragongo’s steep slope causes lava to flow as fast as 60 mph!

    Check out the full article here

    http://bowlofknowledge.blogspot.com/2011/08/extremes-of-earth.html

    (via k-tboundary-deactivated20130724)

  4. ifsweetnesscanwin:

arenaceous shale.

    ifsweetnesscanwin:

    arenaceous shale.

    (via life-is-go0d)

  5. skepttv:

    Time-lapse: Biggest Greenland glacier break-up

    In August 2010, an area of ice four times the size of Manhattan broke away from the Petermann glacier in the biggest ice calving ever to occur in Greenland. Now, Jason Box of Byrd Polar Research Center and Alun Hubbard from Aberystwyth University have captured images that show how dramatically the fjord has changed between 2009 and 2011 (see video above). Time-lapse movies also document two smaller ice break-ups that occurred in 2009.

    During the past decade, Box and his team have been using satellite images to measure changes in the widest glaciers in Greenland. They recently concluded that melting and land and sea surface temperature were only linked in glaciers with ice shelves, which are constrained to near sea-level and are therefore most influenced by temperature variations.  However, changes in the Petermann glacier were more extreme compared to others: it retreated by 13 km in early August 2010 after the calving.

    “What the break-up means in terms of inland ice acceleration and draw-down of the ice sheet remains to be seen, but will be revealed by the GPS data recovered which we are now processing,” says Hubbard.

    Journal reference: Annals of Glaciology

    Sandrine Ceurstemont, editor, New Scientist TV

    (via skeptv)

  6. ohscience:

blue azurite rosette on matrix specimen

    ohscience:

    blue azurite rosette on matrix specimen

    (via chondritic)

  7. it-sfullofstars:

BIF
  8. itsfullofstars:

Physics Nobel Explainer: Why Is Expanding Universe Accelerating?
More than a decade after prize-worthy find, dark energy still baffles.
 
What goes up must come down. Few on Earth would argue with the fundamental law of gravity. But today the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to three scientists who uncovered a dark side of the force.
New Nobel laureates Saul Perlmutter and Adam Riess of the U.S. and Brian Schmidt of Australia contributed to the discovery that the universe is not only expanding but also speeding up.
The finding led to the now widely accepted theory of dark energy, a mysterious force that repels gravity. Measurements show that dark energy accounts for about 74 percent of the substance of the universe.
Keep reading.

    itsfullofstars:

    Physics Nobel Explainer: Why Is Expanding Universe Accelerating?

    More than a decade after prize-worthy find, dark energy still baffles.

    What goes up must come down. Few on Earth would argue with the fundamental law of gravity. But today the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to three scientists who uncovered a dark side of the force.

    New Nobel laureates Saul Perlmutter and Adam Riess of the U.S. and Brian Schmidt of Australia contributed to the discovery that the universe is not only expanding but also speeding up.

    The finding led to the now widely accepted theory of dark energy, a mysterious force that repels gravity. Measurements show that dark energy accounts for about 74 percent of the substance of the universe.

    Keep reading.

  9. highcountrynews:

Nitrate contamination in deep groundwater used as drinking water. Areas in red exceed Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Areas in yellow are of concern.  From USGS.

    highcountrynews:

    Nitrate contamination in deep groundwater used as drinking water. Areas in red exceed Safe Drinking Water Act standards. Areas in yellow are of concern.  From USGS.

  10. ➞ SciPak: Earth Science Word of the Week: Hypocenter

    scipak:

    What it means: The hypocenter is the location, including depth, where an earthquake originates. You may have heard the term epicenter in reports following an earthquake. That’s the area on Earth’s surface above where a quake occurred. But, it doesn’t necessarily tell the whole story,…

    (Source: sciencemag.org)

  11. rocketdigital:

It’s literally an Alien World.

    rocketdigital:

    It’s literally an Alien World.

  12. ➞ My life at the moment.

    Geochemistry is fascinating stuff.

    (Source: goodgeology)

  13. 
The shaping of our Earth, thanks to Plate Tectonics.
For hundreds of millions of years, our land has been crunched, stretched, submerged, and thrown into the sky because of the plates that lay over our Earth. It’s created the landscape we see now, but that continues to change every day, with landmasses slowly making their way across the globe, which will (theoretically) one day smash together again to create the super continent (estimated in 150-250 Ma) Pangea Ultima.

    The shaping of our Earth, thanks to Plate Tectonics.

    For hundreds of millions of years, our land has been crunched, stretched, submerged, and thrown into the sky because of the plates that lay over our Earth. It’s created the landscape we see now, but that continues to change every day, with landmasses slowly making their way across the globe, which will (theoretically) one day smash together again to create the super continent (estimated in 150-250 Ma) Pangea Ultima.

    (Source: crownedrose)

  14. migeo:

I love this stuff. I love a rock that is, basically, all shells and can make cannonballs bounce. So when I had a chance to get my hands on some coquina for the first time ever, you can bet I fondled it. It’s harder than you’d expect for something famously soft enough to absorb enormous balls of metal hurtling toward them at speeds meant to destroy. It feels quite solid. And very, very shelly. (via En Tequila Es Verdad)

    migeo:

    I love this stuff. I love a rock that is, basically, all shells and can make cannonballs bounce. So when I had a chance to get my hands on some coquina for the first time ever, you can bet I fondled it. It’s harder than you’d expect for something famously soft enough to absorb enormous balls of metal hurtling toward them at speeds meant to destroy. It feels quite solid. And very, very shelly. (via En Tequila Es Verdad)

  15. The Natural Bridge in Virginia is a 215 foot high, 90 foot wide remnant of a cave system that was created nearly 200 million years ago by what is known as Cedar Creek today.
The original limestone and dolomite, which the bridge is composed of, was deposited around 500 million years ago during the Cambrian and Ordovician. Throughout the Cambrian and early Ordovician, Laurentia was located at the equator and most of the land was covered in a shallow sea.
These shallow seas were the source of vast amounts of carbonate deposits that were then effected by multiple orogenies that folded and compressed the land into a magnificent arrangement of karst topography which is seen throughout Virginia today. 

    The Natural Bridge in Virginia is a 215 foot high, 90 foot wide remnant of a cave system that was created nearly 200 million years ago by what is known as Cedar Creek today.

    The original limestone and dolomite, which the bridge is composed of, was deposited around 500 million years ago during the Cambrian and Ordovician. Throughout the Cambrian and early Ordovician, Laurentia was located at the equator and most of the land was covered in a shallow sea.

    These shallow seas were the source of vast amounts of carbonate deposits that were then effected by multiple orogenies that folded and compressed the land into a magnificent arrangement of karst topography which is seen throughout Virginia today.